FRIZZY, DRY HAIR? IT’S NOT YOU – IT’S THE WEATHER!

4.19.2022

Anyone with curly hair knows that when you step outside on a humid day, you get the dreaded frizzy, puffy curls. That’s because the amount of moisture in the air, or lack of, has major implications for your natural texture.Why does this happen —  and how can you prevent it? Your curls  are made up […]

Anyone with curly hair knows that when you step outside on a humid day, you get the dreaded frizzy, puffy curls. That’s because the amount of moisture in the air, or lack of, has major implications for your natural texture.Why does this happen —  and how can you prevent it?

Your curls  are made up of protein bundles, and moisture in the air can change how the protein bundles bind together. When there’s  extra water in the air, the bonds that make up your hair break apart,  causing your curls  to swell and “puff out”. That’s where the dreaded frizz comes from! When the air is drier, any moisture in your hair often escapes into the air. And that’s where staticky , brittle hair comes in.

The good news is, there are steps you can take to minimize  the weather’s effect on the curls you love so dearly.

DRY AIR DOESN’T HAVE TO MEAN DRY HAIR

Dry air is common in colder months and in Northern areas. To prevent dry strands from forming knots and breaking easily, you need to hydrate your hair more.

Try  co-washing or water wa  help quench your thirsty curls. Both of these techniques add water into your hair and seal it in, allowing  you to re-style with more hydrating products between full washes. Even just spraying your hair with a bottle filled with water will help.

Using products with extra hydration, such as our  Products with film-forming humectants form a seal that keeps crucial moisture from escaping. These kinds of humectants include aloe (which is the first ingredient in Maui Moisture products ), flaxseed (we’ve got a collection for that too), and more.

 

FIGHTING HUMIDITY, FIGHTING FRIZZ

Humidity is a delicate balance. When it’s not overwhelming, it can  bring out your curl pattern and give your curls extra definition as they soak up the moisture in the air. But when humidity levels rise further, you may deal with limp, puffy and frizzy curls. Volume says “bye!”, and so does definition – all because your hair is now absorbing TOO much moisture from the air.

To fight this, don’t stop hydrating – use more lightweight hydration to keep your curls juuust moisturized enough so they don’t need to take in as much moisture from the air. No hydration AND too much hydration will just start that frizzy cycle all over again.

Lightweight products like our Flaxseed or Hibiscus Water collections will be your best bet. You want to balance your hair’s natural moisture and layer products to seal in their benefits. Plus, finishing off your styling products with a gel can help seal the cuticle and stop frizz in its tracks.

 

 

BUT HOW DO I KNOW HOW HUMID OR DRY THE AIR IS?

It seems pretty obvious – just step outside! But by the time you’re out there, your hair is already suffering from the air’s moisture or dryness. Instead, be proactive with your routine to achieve your best texture yet.

DEW POINT

Knowing the dew point is one way to determine how dry or humid the air will be. It measures the amount of moisture in the air (and can be easily found in your weather app).

Dry air = Dew point below 50° F

Comfortable range = Between 50° – 59° F

Humid air = Above 60° F

RELATIVE HUMIDITY

The percentage of humidity is on a 100% scale, so if the day reads as 100% humidity, that means the air is filled up with all the moisture it can take. A comfortable range for this is around 45%, as it is not too humid or too dry.

Dry air = Humidity below 30%

Comfortable range = Between 30% and 50%

Humid air = Above 50%

GREAT CURLS ARE ALWAYS IN SEASON

Your best curls deserve to stick around year-long, no matter the humidity or aridity of the air. Don’t let frizz or dry curls get you down – just treat your hair right ahead of time. So you can rock those natural curls, whatever the weather.

 

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